HomeInnkeeper’s BlogSavannah By SeasonGet Away in Fall › Visit Historical Places: Take 5-day Trip!…

Visit Historical Places: Take 5-day Trip! Tycoons Enrich Savannah and the Georgia Coast

SAVANNAH, GEORGIA —  Friendly Savannah’s reputation is one of reciprocity. Little Green Palm Inn lodging in Savannah’s Landmark Historic District has begun a quiet campaign to thank “the one” who befriended and contributed to Savannah beauty and allure — beginning with Andrew Carnegie and Thomas Carnegie, titans of American iron and steel industries.

“Too often we forget the shoulders on which we stand,” explains Diane McCray Crews. When studying U.S. history, we find that many USA tycoons began modestly, too! “For our guests who choose cozy bed and breakfast lodging, these Savannah stories and Georgia coast stories add to charm and meritorious reasons to visit Savannah and Georgia.”

Get away for your 5-day travel, lodging at Green Palm Inn for your Georgia coast day trips.

What is the impact of one or two single people for generations living in and visiting Savannah and the Georgia Coast?

Dungeness, the home of Thomas Carnegie on Cumberland Island GA circa 1958

After extensive renovation Dungeness (photo circa 1958) on Cumberland Island, Georgia USA | Public Domain Photo by Philip E. Gardner, HABS photographer.

Thomas Morrison Carnegie built Dungeness on Cumberland Island. His older brother, iron and steel tycoon Andrew Carnegie left generous footprints in Savannah and along the Georgia coast. The Carnegie parents borrowed money from an American relative to make their move from Scotland to the USA.  In 2016 descendants of Thomas M. Carnegie retain a portion of Cumberland Island — Georgia’s largest and most southernmost barrier island — and host travelers at the stately Greyfield Inn. Reachable by boat only, most of the island is Cumberland Island National Seashore, managed by the U.S. National Park Service and promoted as “Where Nature and History Meet”.

In writing about Charles H. Morris’s restoration of Kehoe Iron Works in Trustees Garden, historian James Byous points to an important Savannah connection to Carnegie Steel. Located near Green Palm Inn, the iron foundry is currently undergoing major restoration.

The Carnegie Library is among Savannah firsts.

“[Carnegie libraries served as] Temples of learning, ambition, aspiration for towns and cities throughout the United States.” — NPR.org, speaking of Andrew Carnegie’s legacy of building public libraries.

Carnegie Library in Savannah GA | Photo (c) Sandy Traub, used with permission

A Savannah first: Carnegie Library, the first free-standing library in Savannah, built for African Americans and funded by Andrew Carnegie during USA segregation.

Located at 537 East Henry Street, the first free-standing library in Savannah, Carnegie Library, was built with funds from Carnegie Corporation to serve African Americans during segregation. As young boys, Supreme Court Associate Justice Clarence Thomas, and the late Pulitzer Prize winning author James Alan McPherson used the Carnegie Library in Savannah.  It is the only example of Prairie Style architecture within the city.

“Erected in 1914, [and dedicated on August 14, 2014] the Carnegie Library was Savannah’s first African American library and was made possible by a donation from Andrew Carnegie [a Scottish-American businessman and philanthropist]. Carnegie was a self-made millionaire and philanthropist who was inspired [as a “working boy”] at a young age by the opportunities that libraries provide their patrons.” — Source: Library of Congress. Read more of the Liveoak Library’s 100th year celebration found at this PDF link.

Savannah GA history photography | Frances Benjamin - Carnegie Corporation of New York | Library of Congress

Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South photograph of Henry Ford Plantation by Frances Benjamin Johnston, funded by Carnegie Corporation of New York and archived in the Library of Congress.

In later years, an $87,000 Carnegie Library grant funded a second Savannah library, built at 2002 Bull Street. It is now the main library with offices serving the regional Liveoak Library system. Twenty-four, free-use public libraries were built in Georgia, thanks to Carnegie Corporation grants.

Carnegie Corporation of New York funded the “Carnegie Survey of the Architecture of the South“, photographed by Frances Benjamin Johnston between 1939 and 1944.  Photographs of architecture in the Savannah vicinity are included in that vast collection, housed in the Library of Congress. Johnston is often considered the first American woman to achieve national prominence in diverse areas of photography.

Ask about weekly rates for your 5-day travel in Savannah! Innkeeper Diane McCray Crews has more insider tips for a delightful Savannah visit any time of year! Just ask when your book your historic Savannah inn lodging at Green Palm Inn.

ABOUT GREEN PALM INN
Featured on Wheel of Fortune, Innkeeper/co-owner Diane McCray Crews touts Green Palm Inn (circa 1897) as “The Softer Side of Savannah”. Originally sea captain cottages, the four-room Gingerbread Classic B&B shares cottage-inn comforts in the quiet of Greene Square’s residential neighborhood in the National Landmark Historic District. Fodor’s guide calls Green Palm Inn a “pleasing little discovery” and “a little gem of an inn”. BedandBreakfast.com named the cottage B&B a top pick for a holiday trip – “Top 10 B&Bs for the Holidays, 2011″. For more information: GreenPalmInn.com; Email GreenPalmInn@aol.com, telephone toll free in USA 888/606-9510, local and international 912/447-8901, 548 East President Street, Savannah, GA USA 31401. Twitter @GreenPalmInn, Facebook, and Pinterest.

Copyright © 2016 Green Palm Inn

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Add Your Own Comment

Add Your Own Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *